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Exodus of Baby Boomers Helping to Fund Higher Employee Pay Adjustments

In a Forbes article titled, Baby Boomers Retiring Rapidly: Are Successors Prepared written by Maureen Metcalf, Forbes Council Member and CEO of Metcalf & Associates, she refers to research by Bonnie Hagemann and co-authors in their book “Leading with Vision” that baby boomers are leaving the workforce at a rapid rate of 10,000 per day or approximately 1 baby boomer every 9 seconds.

In our compensation consulting work, we’re seeing this phenomenon unfolding with our private and public sector clients.  We have a public government client that experienced an average $3.75 hourly pay difference between leaving employees’ average pay and their new hires’ average pay in 2018, and they are on-track for a $2.44 difference in 2019.  This may not seem like much money but it equates to $640,000 annual wage savings in 2018 and approximately $724,000 savings in 2019 based on a 15% turnover rate.

Some clients are redistributing these baby boomer exodus wage savings to help fund higher annual employee pay adjustments.  The 2019 annual WorldatWork Compensation study is projecting a national average of 3.3% for employee pay adjustments in 2020. The represents a new historical high after years of 3.0% or less average annual employee pay adjustments to base pay.

Human Resource and Compensation professionals need to help their management teams with strategic redistribution of baby boomer wage savings and succession planning during the next ten years.  The 3rd and 4th quartile wages will be out the door during the next decade and its recipients will be on the beach, traveling in an RV or parachuting out of a plane like past president George H.W. Bush did to celebrate his 90th birthday on June 12, 2014.

Learn more by visiting www.johansongroup.net or www.dbsquared.com or request a free consultation by visiting https://www.dbsquared.com/consultation-request-2/.

HAPPY POST 4TH of JULY

HAPPY POST 4TH of JULYNow that we’re on the backside of the celebratory 4th of July – Independence Day fireworks and picnics, it is time to get back to work with attracting and retaining employees through competitive pay and strategic total rewards benefits. During the recent 4th of July holiday, it was amazing to see how small compacted fireworks create such spectacular nighttime displays of colorful sparks. When lit, these small containers in relative size compared to the resulting expansive firework displays are a profound mystery of awe and yet a technological mastery of increasing proportion. The chemistry of fireworks is based on the theory of combustion, but a simple observation could be made based on the theory of compression.Speaking of compression, many of our compensation clients are experiencing pay compression issues. With tighter labor markets and increasing starting wages for new hires, the pay levels between newly hired employees and employees with one to three years of tenure are getting tighter. The compression of the air-fuel mixture in an internal-combustion engine just before ignition creates powerful energy. The employee energy associated from pay compression issues can be significant until the employer resolves these issues. Identification of pay compression starts the process towards releasing the valve on negative pay comments and the potential of losing tenure employees. Employers without internal pay structures/plans will use a “time in position” percentage of market pay means to determine pay adjustments for employees expressing pay compression concerns with newly hired employees. Employers with internal pay structures/plans that are competitive with market pay means by position will use a “time in position” percentage of the internal job grade pay range midpoint for pay movement decisions that lessen pay compression problems.The average timeframe for an employee to reach their respective position pay range midpoint is a key factor when addressing pay compression in an organization. The private sector employees on the average tend to reach their pay range midpoints within 4 to 5 years. The public sector employees on the average will reach their pay range midpoints in 8 to 10 years depending on the average annual pay percentage increases of 3 to 4% of base pay. Also, the pay range spread will be another key component in determining how quickly employees will reach position pay range midpoints.Let’s hope that your internal pay compression situation can be resolved with firework “Sparklers” instead of huge sky-filling firework displays with M-80 sonic booms!Happy Post 4th of July Boom! Learn more by visiting www.dbsquared.com or request a free consultation by visiting https://www.dbsquared.com/consultation-request-ty/.